1 Choose an essay to transform into a speech. 2 Narrow or shift the focus of your speech. 3 Choose details for your hook, body, and clincher. 4 Choose an organizational pattern for the body of your speech. 3 Draft your speech.

Student Name:

Speaking Rhetoric – Your Turn Assignment

DIRECTIONS: Follow the steps below write the first draft of your speech.

Steps

1 Choose an essay to transform into a speech.

2 Narrow or shift the focus of your speech.

3 Choose details for your hook, body, and clincher.

4 Choose an organizational pattern for the body of your speech.

3 Draft your speech.

Step 1: Choose an essay to transform into a speech. The essay you choose should develop a theme or tell a story that has a point. Two of the writing assignments in this course include just such an assignment. If you completed these lessons already, you can use the essay you wrote for one of those assignments. If you did not complete these lessons yet, you’ll need to find another narrative or thematic essay that you’ve written–or find or even write a new one just for this assignment.

Type your title of your essay in the space below.

Step 2: Narrow or shift the focus of your speech. Your essay may contain too much detail to work as a speech. Remember that a speech is more compelling (for most audiences) if it lasts no longer than fifteen minutes. Identify a theme or focus for your speech that is more narrow than the focus in your essay, if you think you would need more than fifteen minutes to convey the essay’s ideas.

Describe the focus of your speech in the space below.

Student Name:

Speaking Rhetoric – Your Turn Assignment

Step 3: Choose details for your hook, body, and clincher. The order in which you say details or make points can be quite different in a speech, compared to an essay on the same topic. For example, the hook is much more important for a speech because you want to get listeners’ attention very quickly, and completely. Scan the sentences and details in your essay to see which ones are mostly likely to create a stir or raise interesting questions in listeners’ minds. Feel free to rewrite those sentences to sound more dramatic or intriguing.

List the details (or copy and paste sentences) from your essay that will appear in each part of your speech.

Hook:

Body:

Clincher:

Step 4: Choose an organizational pattern for the body of your speech. Deciding on a pattern for your speech can make it much easier to select details that will appear in the body section. (You may not have time to include them all.) Make sure that the pattern you choose can support your overall theme or point, though.

In the space below, identify or describe the organizational pattern you chose.

Student Name:

Speaking Rhetoric – Your Turn Assignment

Step 5: Draft your speech. Using the notes you recorded in the previous four steps, write your speech out more or less as you would say it. You don’t have to include every single word you would say, but you need to write out the most important statements and list the most important details. As you write, keep in the mind the suggestions in this lesson about avoiding wordiness, making your sentences easy to follow when heard aloud, and using simpler rather than more obscure language.

In the space below, copy and paste your essay. Then, edit the essay to transform it into a speech instead.

  1. student name:
  2. title of essay:
  3. focus of speech:
  4. hook:
  5. body:
  6. clincher:
  7. organizational pattern:
  8. speech: