Critically analyses the different stakeholders (for instance local community members, visitors/attendees/tourists, event organisers, public bodies) that affect and are affected by the event, including their different interests and perspectives

Assignment task

Task:

Produce an applied case-study, focusing on one event, which:

 

  • Provides a critical analysis of the context and setting in which the event operates (for example will you focus on the political context? The cultural or social context? Will you be examining an event within a community setting, mega event, hallmark event?);
  • Critically analyses the different stakeholders (for instance local community members, visitors/attendees/tourists, event organisers, public bodies) that affect and are affected by the event, including their different  interests and perspectives;
  • Evaluates the impact(s) of the event on society and stakeholders (i.e. social, political, economic and environmental impacts)
  • Uses one or more specific theoretical perspectives in your analysis.

 

It is important that you identify the setting  in which the event operates through size and scale (i.e. private events, local or community events, major events, hallmark events, mega events), form and content (i.e. cultural events, festivals, heritage commemoration, parades and processions, religious events, political and state events, arts and entertainment, performing arts, literature and visual arts events, meetings and conventions, trade and consumer shows,  sports events, business events, fairs, non-for-profit events).

 

Stakeholders may be any individual, organisation or group that has a relationship with the event (Bowdin et al., 2001). You may choose from a variety of stakeholder groups, for instance a host organisation, host community, media, sponsors, co-workers or event participants and spectators. You are allowed to examine as many stakeholder groups as you want (although remember that you must be able to provide a detailed discussion of how each stakeholder group is affected by the event) but you must include a minimum of 2 stakeholder groups. However it is essential to identify stakeholder groups you a) are interested in exploring, and b) can research using published material.

 

Examples of topics you can pick for the case study may be as varied as: “The 2014 FIFA World Cup and the socio-economic impact on Rio De Janeiro’s Favela residents”; “ The Notting Hill Carnival and its impact on the Caribbean diaspora”; “The socio-economic legacy of the 2004 Summer Olympics on the city of Athens”, “The impact of Liverpool’s city of culture on host residents”, “The contribution of wine festivals to the Champagne region’s economy”, “The socio-political impact of Sydney’s Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade on the LGBT community”. You need to decide the scope and focus of your case study!

 

Successful candidates will:

 

  • Provide a detailed discussion of the context of the event and the stakeholders being examined. You should state whether you will focus your analysis on the political, cultural or social context of the event. Particular emphasis should be put on how issues such as culture, ethnicity, class or gender are relevant to the production or consumption of the event (note: you can decide to focus on one or two areas e.g. class and ethnicity, you do not have to cover everything we touch on in the module);

 

  • Consider the historical and/or contemporary issues affecting the stakeholders’ relationship with the production and/or consumption of events;

 

  • Discuss critically the particular impacts of the event at hand (which could be social, cultural, health, environmental, economic etc., and may be positive, negative or neutral);

 

  • Use a clear, well-researched and understood theoretical perspective (or perspectives) (e.g. class, gender, ethnicity, culture, habitus, authenticity) to analyse stakeholders and their relationship with the event;

 

  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the relationship between theoretical perspectives and social practices;

 

  • Incorporate a wide range of references from academic and non-academic sources;

 

  • Structure the argument clearly, making effective use of headings/subheadings where appropriate;

 

  • Follow the Harvard referencing system;

 

  • Where appropriate, use a range of diagrams and other illustrations to support the argument.

 

 

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Indicative guide to the sections, content and our marking criteria
Section What to include Our questions as assessors
Introduction -An outline of what you intend to cover in the case study (i.e. the event and its context, the stakeholders, and the issues you intend to explore).

-A quick overview of the theoretical perspective(s) you will utilise in your analysis.

-Does the introduction set the context for the rest of the work?

-Is the scope and content of the case study clear (particularly regarding the context of the event, the stakeholders and the key issues to be explored)?

-Is the theoretical perspective clear?

Theoretical perspective(s) (e.g. class, gender, ethnicity, culture, habitus, authenticity, power relations, space and place) -Definitions of key concepts.

-Explanation of all the relevant ideas.

-Key debates surrounding the theoretical perspective(s).

-Where appropriate, different writers’ approaches to the theoretical perspective(s).

-Exceptional work will show wider reading and a detailed, critical understanding of the perspective(s), including strengths and weaknesses.

-Have all the relevant terms been clearly defined and adequately explained?

-Does the student show a detailed understanding of key concepts and debates?

-Is there evidence of wide reading?

-Has the student been able to critique concepts and perspectives?

 

Context and setting of event and clearly defined stakeholder groups -Clearly identified event and the context of that event (will you examine the political, social or cultural context?)

– Clearly identify the setting such as the size, scale, form and content of the event

– Clear definition of the stakeholders that affect or are affected by the event, which can enable the reader to appreciate their distinctiveness.

-Characteristics of the event and the place where it takes place i.e. (is it a food festival in Oxford? A marriage in India? A Sports mega event in Spain?). This helps the reader understand the nature and significance of the event.

-Stronger work will also use theoretical perspectives to interpret and understand the stakeholder groups and the context of the event.

-Has the student chosen a clear and distinct event?

Has the student clearly explained the context (e.g. political, cultural or social) of the chosen event?

-Has the student chosen clear and distinct stakeholders?

-Is the event of a size and composition to allow for research?

-Does their choice of event and stakeholders reflect thoughtful background research and wide reading?

-Has the student been able to give a clear and detailed understanding of the setting in which the event takes place (e.g. community event, mega event, sports event, festival)?

-Has the student offered detailed and informed insights into the event’s characteristics e.g. purpose, form, size?

-Has the student been able to apply theoretical perspectives effectively in their examination of the event?

Factors influencing the relation between the event and stakeholders? -Clear discussion of factors influencing the relation of stakeholders with the event. This may include social, cultural, economic, technological, political and environmental/ecological factors.

-The different perspectives and interests of stakeholders

-How stakeholders affect the event.

-Clear and consistent use of evidence, drawn from credible sources.

-Consideration of historical and/or contemporary influences (i.e. globalisation, travel, cultural homogenisation).

-Stronger work will again use theoretical perspective(s) to analyse the factors influencing stakeholders and their relationship with the event.

-Is there evidence of substantial background research?

-Has appropriate evidence, drawn from credible sources, been used to support claims?

-Is there a strong and clear connection made between theoretical concepts drawn from the literature and the findings relevant to the event and the stakeholders?

-Does the discussion show a detailed understanding of a range of relevant issues (e.g. concerning social, cultural, economic, technological, political, ecological, contextual factors)?

-Has the student been able to apply theoretical perspectives effectively in their examination of the factors influencing the stakeholders’ relationship with the event?

Impacts of the event (on various stakeholders, economy, environment etc.) -A discussion which shows awareness of a range of consequences (which may include social, cultural economic, environmental, political or health consequences).

-Evidence, drawn from credible sources, to support your arguments. However, you may speculate on consequences based on the literature and your analysis.

-A critical discussion, which recognises that impacts can be positive, negative, or neutral, or be simultaneously good and bad, depending on the perspective being adopted.

-Stronger work will make links between impacts and theoretical perspectives e.g. how events may reproduce, transform or challenge issues related to power, identity, environment, capital, class, gender and ethnic relations.

-Is there evidence of critical thinking?

-Has appropriate evidence, drawn from credible sources, been used to support claims?

-Is there a strong and clear connection made between theoretical concepts drawn from the literature and the findings relevant to the event and the stakeholders?

-Does the discussion show a detailed understanding of a range of impacts (e.g. concerning social, cultural, economic and environmental as appropriate)?

-Has the student been able to identify, evaluate and distinguish between potentially positive and negative impacts?

-Does the student appreciate that some impacts can be both positive and negative depending on the perspective being adopted?

-Has the student been able to apply theoretical perspectives effectively in examining the impacts of the event and how stakeholders are impacted or impact the event?

Conclusion -A summary of the key points raised in the paper

-Stronger students will provide a mature, critical discussion of the implications of their findings e.g. for individuals, social groups, organisations, societies, and commercial/non- commercial stakeholders, including for example governments, policy makers, practitioners and researchers.

-Stronger work will again make effective links between theoretical concepts/debates and “real-life” practice.

-Does the conclusion summarise the key points raised in the main body?

-Does the student appreciate the implications emerging from the findings for the identified stakeholder groups and other stakeholders?

-Has the student been able to think critically about broader implications for individuals, groups, communities, society, organisations, the environment, political decision making etc. ?

-Has the student been able to apply theoretical perspectives effectively in discussing the implications of their findings?

 

General assessor questions relevant for the entire paper:

 

-Is the style, grammar and structure appropriate for the level?

-Are full and correct Harvard references used throughout to support points?

-Is there a complete list of references presented (in the correct Harvard format) at the end of the work?

-Does the student rely excessively on quotes and arguments taken from existing works without evidence of critical appraisal?

-Can the student synthesise ideas and present them using their own words to show a strong grasp of abstract concepts, particularly as they are applied to understanding “real-life” practice?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment criteria

        Grade Analysis (40%)

 

 

Argument, grasp of issues, evaluation, critique and interpretation

Structure (20%)

 

 

Organisation: introduction, ordered argument, conclusion; placing of evidence to support argument

 

Knowledge and use of Literature and Resources (40%)

 

Breadth and depth of reading, use of literature and relevant resources, and referencing using the Harvard Method

Grade A+ (75%+)

and

A (70 -74%)

 

 

Excellent analysis of subject, addresses relevant issues in an interesting manner, displays creative interpretation, excellent argument

 

Excellent introduction, ordered argument and conclusion; creative use of evidence in support of argument Reading in a wide range of appropriate literature, excellent use of literature and relevant resources, correct referencing method
Grade B+ (65 – 69%)

and

B (60 – 64%)

 

 

Very good analysis of subject, addresses relevant issues well, shows strong ability to evaluate, very good argument

 

Very good introduction, ordered argument and conclusion; independent use of evidence in support of argument Reading in a fairly wide range of appropriate literature, very good use of literature and relevant resources, generally correct referencing method
Grade C+ (55 – 59%)

and

C (50 – 54%)

 

 

Satisfactory, (largely descriptive rather than critical) treatment of subject, recognises relevant issues, shows satisfactory ability to evaluate, solid sense of argument

 

Satisfactory introduction, ordered argument and conclusion; solid use of evidence in support of argument Satisfactory range of reading, sound use of literature and relevant resources, broadly correct referencing method

 

Grade R (Resit)

(30 – 49%)

 

 

Unacceptable treatment of subject, and/or little recognition of issues, argument, or independent interpretation, question not answered Little evidence of coherent structure; and/or little attempt to deploy evidence in support of argument Little reading, and/or little grounding in literature or relevant resources (fewer than 20 sources), referencing method incorrect
Grade F (Fail)

 

(0-29%)

Unacceptable treatment of subject, no recognition of issues, and/or argument, independent interpretation, and/or question not answered No evidence of coherent structure; and/or no attempt to deploy evidence in support of argument No reading, and/or grounding in literature or relevant resources (fewer than 20 sources), referencing method incorrect