Does your obligation to the organization’s well-being provide ethical justification for informing superiors about the shortcomings?

Answer the following questions: You’re working on a project with another worker and he’s not doing well. His contributions need constant correction. Does your obligation to the organization’s well-being provide ethical justification for informing superiors about the shortcomings? Does the ethical situation change if you’re also competing with that workmate for a promotion? If it changes, how and why? If not, why not?

Sources from Chapter 6 Employee’s Ethics: Getting a Job, Getting a Promotion, Leaving; 6.3 Plotting and Promotion