Explain how the study was carried out and identify specifically the type of qualitative research techniques that were used to collect and analyze the data.

Instructions
You will now acquaint yourself with the key differences between qualitative and quantitative research. This assignment will have two tasks and you will combine both parts into one document for submission.

For the first part of this task, in your own words, explain the difference between (1) continuous versus categorical variables and (2) nominal data versus interval data. Include examples to support your findings.Review a couple of the textbooks for more information about qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research.

For part two of this task, please use uploaded two peer-reviewed articles about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (I have attached the articles). If all the examples are of the same type (i.e. all qualitative or all quantitative, re-examine the literature to find an example of the other type of study.). Choose one article where the study is purely qualitative and one article where the study is purely quantitative.

For the qualitative article, explain how the study was carried out and identify specifically the type of qualitative research techniques that were used to collect and analyze the data.
For the quantitative article, explain how the study was carried out and identify all the variables assessed/measured in the study. For each variable, explain what type of variable it is (i.e. continuous, categorical, nominal, and interval).

Length: 5-6 pages, not including title and reference pages

Your assignment should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to this topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Please use the active voice.
Reference:
Martindale, S. L., Morissette, S. B., & Rowland, Jared A. (2017). Sleep quality affects cognitive functioning in returning combat veterans beyond combat exposure, PTSD, and mild TBI history. Neuropsychology, 31(1), 93-104

Scott, J., Matt, G., Wrocklage, K., Crnich, C., Jordan, J., & Southwick, S. (2015). A quantitative meta-analysis of neurocognitive functioning in posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychological Bulletin, 141(1), 105-140. doi: 10.1037/a0038039