In Focus: Safe and Legal Butt-Enhancement Procedures

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In Focus: Safe and Legal Butt-Enhancement Procedures

The media have an essential role in the manner of representing certain realities. One of the representations that are given importance by the audience, particularly the female audience, is the physical perfection they associate to women on the television and magazines. This is supported by the fact that from 2000 to 2009 the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) reported that there has been an increase in cosmetic procedures undergone by women. The third cosmetic procedure that increased during these years is the buttock lifts, which has a 132% increase (Berberick 2, 4). This paper aims to focus on the rapid increase of malpractice in buttock augmentation procedures due to injections sold in the black-market. This paper will particularly focus on the case of Claudia Aderotimi in order to further explain the current trend in the black-market cosmetic for the above mentioned procedure.

In retrospect, Lyle Black, who is a plastic surgeon, recalls that a doctor once told him that most of the Brazilian women wanted to have smaller breasts and bigger butt (qtd. in Burling A01). In line with this, due to the increasing diversity of the culture in America, along with female representations such as that of Beyonce and J. Lo, women now want to have big buttocks. In addition, not just the Americans undergo such procedure, but also women from other western countries, such as the case of Claudia Aderotimi (Burling A01). Specifically, Claudia Aderotimi and her friend Theresa Gyamfi were from London and both consulted doctors from their country for the buttock enhancement procedures. However, they were able to stumble upon a website regarding buttock injection enhancement, and they took it and paid $2,000 for the first injection, and $1,800 for the second injection. The process was done in Hampton Inn, Philadelphia. The alleged person who had carried out the procedure was Padge Victoria Windslowe, also known as black madam (Steele B01). The black-market procedures are cheap, and that is the reason why many consider undergoing this type of buttock enhancement. In comparison, a buttock enhancement injected during a party or in a hotel room could only cost a maximum of $3,000 compared to the $10,000 cost when delivered legally (Burling A01).

In addition, according to the study conducted by the ASPS, most of the American women prefer fat injections compared to implants. The process involves collecting fats from the body of the patient which are then transferred to their buttocks. It may be easier to “just eat more cheeseburger,” (Burling A01) but fat cannot be controlled. Nonetheless, there are also other forms of buttocks enhancement products sold in the market; these include padded undergarments, pills, and creams. They may be non-invasive processes, but Kearney-Cooke highlights that surgery, or the process of changing one’s body, will also lead to a transformation in one’s life. Women should also consider that the females in the entertainment world have the whole package, they do not only have big buttocks, but they are also sexy and have all the time and money to alter their appearances (Burling A01).

In conclusion, the want to alter a person’s natural body without proper and legal clinical procedures can lead to fatality. Moreover, in reality, the female figures seen in the entertainment world have the financial capacity to undergo surgeries and not put their lives in danger inside a hotel room. Essentially, the need to change one’s appearance also necessitates financial, emotional, and psychological preparedness and must not be done haphazardly in order to avoid any unfavorable events.

 

Works Cited

Berberick, Stephanie Nicholl. “The Objectification of Women in Mass Media: Female

Self-Image in Misogynist Culture.” The New York Sociologist 5 (2010): 1-15. Print.

Burling, Stacey. “Chasing Shifting Body Ideals: Homework Still a Must.” The Philidelphia

Inquirer14 Feb. 2011: A01. Print.

Steele, Allison. “Black Madam’ Hel for Trial in Buttock-Enhancement Death.” The

Philidelphia Inquirer11 Oct. 2012: B01. Print.