How does Imagist poetry register the events and ideas of its moment?

Imagism was, as F. S. Flint said, ‘like all other literary movements […] a
general movement, a product and impulse of the time’ (Christopher
Middleton, ‘Documents on Imagism from the Papers of F. S. Flint’, in The
Review: A Magazine of Poetry and Criticism, 15 [1965], pp. 35-51). How does
Imagist poetry register the events and ideas of its moment?

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