IR:Democracy, Autocracy and Regime change: Why has the collapse of the Soviet Union given rise to different outcomes in terms of regime type? Discuss with reference either to two or more specific cases OR to two regions within the former Soviet Union (e.g. the Baltic region and Central Asia)

Comparative Study (60%) (1,800 words)
The essay will consist of a comparative study of at least two, but no more than four, relevant real life cases: either those that we have discussed during the module or other cases of which you have specialist knowledge. The cases may well be individual countries, although a broader comparison of two regions of the world (e.g. the former Soviet Union and Latin America, see topic 10 below) is also possible. Each of the topics listed below focuses on a particular element of the regime or of processes of regime change and are designed to allow you to draw on the cases. It is important in this essay that you demonstrate your theoretical understanding of democracy, autocracy and regime change, using the theoretical approaches explored during the first half of the module and in the first assignment, and then apply these theories to concrete cases. The 1,800-word limit excludes footnotes and bibliography.
This work constitutes 60% of the total assessment on this module and the qualities looked for will be: clarity and effectiveness of presentation, breadth of reading and use of sources, engagement with relevant literature, awareness of the context of the topic, and the links with the wider issues involved.
This work constitutes 60% of the total assessment on this module and the qualities looked for will be: clarity and effectiveness of presentation, breadth of reading and use of sources, engagement with relevant literature, awareness of the context of the topic, and the links with the wider issues involved.
Question: Why has the collapse of the Soviet Union given rise to different outcomes in terms of regime type? Discuss with reference either to two or more specific cases OR to two regions within the former Soviet Union (e.g. the Baltic region and Central Asia).
Essential Reading
Haerpfer, C. W., Bernhagen, P., Inglehart, R. F. and Welzel, C. (2009) Democratization. New York: Oxford University Press, Michael Bratton, Chapter 22, ‘Sub-Saharan Africa’, pp. 339-355.
Hale, H. E. (2016) ‘25 Years After The USSR: What’s Gone Wrong?’, Journal of Democracy, 27(3), pp. 24–35.
Pomerantsev, P. (2015) ‘The Kremlin’s Information War’, Journal of Democracy, 26(4), pp. 40–50.
Radnitz, S. (2012) ‘Oil in the Family: Managing presidential succession in Azerbaijan’, Democratization, 19(1), pp. 60–77.
Tudoroiu, T. (2015) ‘Democracy and state capture in Moldova’, Democratization, 22(4), pp.655-678.
Wheatley, J. (2005) Georgia from National Awakening to Rose Revolution: Delayed Transition in the Former Soviet Union (Post-Soviet Politics).
Abingdon: Routledge, Chapter 5, ‘Profile of a Corrupt Regime: The Georgian State 1996-2001’.
Åslund, A. (2017) ‘The Three Regions of the Old Soviet Bloc’, Journal of Democracy, 28(1), pp. 89–101.
Linz, J. J. and Stepan, A. (1996) Problems of democratic transition and consolidation: Southern Europe, South America, and Post-Communist Europe. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.