PRIEST AND PROGRAMMERS – TECHNOLOGIES OF POWER IN THE ENGINEERED LANDSCAPES OF BALI. AUTHOR: J. STEPHEN LANSING

The main components of your review:
1. A review gives the reader a concise summary of the content. This includes a relevant description of the topic as well as its overall perspective, argument, or purpose.
2. A review offers a critical assessment of the content. This involves your reactions to the work under review: what strikes you as noteworthy, whether or not it was effective or persuasive, and how it enhanced your understanding of the issues at hand.
3. A review often suggests whether or not the audience would appreciate it.
Be very sparse with references – a book review is not an essay. Only include references when it is really necessary.
IMPORTANT:
– Developing an argument:
A good book review starts with close reading of your selected book and detailed note making during that reading. Make a careful summary of the book. In making the summary keep questions the following in mind:
¬ What is the thesis—or main argument—of the book? If the author wanted you to get one idea from the book, what would it be? How does it compare or contrast to the world you know? What has the book accomplished?
¬ What exactly is the subject or topic of the book? Does the author cover the subject adequately? Does the author cover all aspects of the subject in a balanced fashion? What is the approach to the subject (topical, analytical, chronological, descriptive)?
¬ How does the author support his argument? What evidence does he use to prove his point? Do you find that evidence convincing? Why or why not? Does any of the author’s information (or conclusions) conflict with other books you’ve read, courses you’ve taken or just previous assumptions you had of the subject?
¬ How does the author structure his argument? What are the parts that make up the whole? Does the argument make sense? Does it persuade you? Why or why not?
¬ How has this book helped you understand the subject?